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  • the JFK assassination; Civil Rights Bill of 1964; campaigning for LBJ in 1964; organization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; introducing Martin Luther King, Jr. to the concept of non-violence; a King-Powell episode regarding Rustin
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • , which angered a number of the ministers. Powell was close to the minister in Chicago, who headed the National Baptist Convention, a man who was so absolutely ignorant that when they named South Parkway Martin Luther King Drive, his church was on South
  • in their meetings with LBJ and Hubert Humphrey; tiger cubs at Atlanta zoo named for President Johnson and Lady Bird; relations with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr and Mrs. King; MLK's assassination and resulting racial problems in Atlanta; concerns and involvement
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • -- I -- 15 his father, of course, was older than I am. And my number one supporter in the Negro community, and I might say one of my number one supporters in Atlanta when I originally ran, was Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. So I've had a very close
  • Oral history transcript, Louis Martin, interview 2 (II), 6/12/1986, by Michael L. Gillette
  • Martin, Louis, 1912-1997
  • Louis Martin
  • See all online interviews with Louis Martin
  • -Johnson line was sold so well and the support was so great for it, because of [Martin Luther] King and Bobby [Kennedy]--you know, all these things happening in the sixties--that the preachers had no problem with their congregations. You weren't running
  • Westmoreland; Robert McNamara leaving LBJ’s staff; LBJ’s view of civil rights; Martin Luther King’s relationship with LBJ and his death; Resurrection City; LBJ meeting with people who wanted to discuss appointments; keeping meetings on or off the record
  • only a matter of days before Martin Luther King was assassinated. Let me ask you to recall what you can about that event, how you learned of it, the President's reaction. J: Well, that was the night we had a Democratic fund-raiser in Washington
  • , 1989 INTERVIEWEE: JOSEPH A. CALIFANO, JR., with comments by Marcel Bryar INTERVIEWER: Michael L. Gillette PLACE: Mr. Califano's office, Washington, D.C. Tape 1 of 1, Side 1 C: In the time of the riots in Washington for [Martin Luther] King [Jr
  • to provide a kind of constructive direction of the movement of people. But for us to stand in the way and say "stop this", we would have been washed away. B: You say "provide direction", in fact in those years, really Martin Luther King's presence
  • Texas protesters arrested and later invited to the Ranch; Jacobsen's opinion of Martin Luther King, Jr.; clothier Louis Roth's anti-Vietnam stance; Martin Luther King's FBI report.
  • problems with Sam Yorty, then-mayor of Los Angeles? J: I don't know. I remember Yorty. I don't know. I don't think he did, but I'm not sure. I remember Yorty though. If you've ever read the FBI report on Martin Luther King, it's a terrible thing. Martin
  • Christian Leadership Conference meetings and the rumor even included the fact that the FBI had a tape recording or recordings of sexual activities of Martin Luther King, and things like that. H: Well, that didn't bother anybody, I'm sure I've got taps
  • Oral history transcript, Louis Martin, interview 1 (I), 5/14/1969, by David G. McComb
  • Martin, Louis, 1912-1997
  • Louis Martin
  • See all online interviews with Louis Martin
  • sometime? M: Oh yes. I must say that in the Kennedy years my job was sort of liaison between the White House and the civil rights people--the NAACP and Urban League types, Whitney or Roy and Martin Luther King. I had worked with all these people during
  • know, we couldn't get passed until Dr. [Martin Luther] King was assassinated. And even if you look at that--I remember proposing it. It's the only time--and I think if you look at the New York Times or something--I was mentioned in the twenty-fourth
  • knew that Antioch College was then trying to recruit blacks, and I transferred. The day I entered Antioch Martin Luther King's wife Coretta, Scott was her last name then, also entered. That is the reason why I transferred from Purdue to Antioch. F
  • How Tucker met LBJ; LBJ’s reputation in regard to civil rights; LBJ’s work as a Vice-President; Tucker’s involvement in the civil rights movement; Martin Luther King; the 1963 March on Washington; LBJ’s interest in civil rights early in his
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • in most of that activity. I was a I was heavily Close to Dr. Martin Luther King --closely associated with all the national civil rights leaders. B: What was your opinion of the Justice Department's, and the Kennedy Administration generally, handling
  • Meeting LBJ in 1960; civil rights demonstrations in Atlanta and subsequent federal laws to override states’ discriminatory laws; Civil Rights Act of 1964; opinions of integration among Atlanta leadership; Ralph McGill; Martin Luther King, Sr. and Jr
  • that Dr. Martin Luther King was leading. $ - - • ' • And. it started over lunch counters and restrooms, and had been .{tnterruptton} Well> of course, there was very much concern to the city and to the pol ice department, · We haq grave
  • president; LBJ's relationship with the Senate during his vice presidency and presidency; comparing LBJ and Mike Mansfield as leaders; judicial appointments of the Kennedy administration, including Luther Terry as surgeon general; cigarette warning labels
  • would have let any of these circumstances interfere with that recollection and knowledge of what was going on. G: Anything on Kennedy's telephone call to Coretta King at the end of the campaign when Martin Luther King was in prison
  • appearance there; 100 billion dollar freedom budget proposal and Bayard Rustin; Bill Coleman’s meeting of black militants; Ben Heineman; LBJ’s relationship with Martin Luther King; inviting radical elements of the civil rights movement to the White House
  • done anything on this conference before? G: Well, of course we've read about it and that sort of thing. Did this experience reveal to you anything about the relationship between Lyndon Johnson and Martin Luther King? A: Well, I gather
  • from diplomacy in current politics; the riots in Washington, D.C., following the assassination of Martin Luther King; LBJ's confusion over the riots, their purpose and leadership; being in New York City for the ordination of Cardinal Terence Cooke
  • the Martin Luther King riots, where he felt that Vietnam was really dividing the country and that we just couldn't afford it economically or politically or for any other reason. I suppose I look back and realize that Lyndon Johnson was a tragic figure because
  • with Mexican-American workers and braceros; exploitation of Mexican-Americans; Cesar Chavez; Memphis sanitation strike in 1968 and eventual wage increase resolution; Martin Luther King’s assassination; problems with communications workers, the International
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • publicity because it had drawn the support and attention of Dr. Martin Luther King and his associate, Dr. [Ralph] Abernathy. It had ceased to be strictly a labor dispute, but emerged as a matter of the dignity of minority people in Memphis. i~volved
  • that if we went the executive order route, well, it was tenuous legally. He thought that the Warren Court would find a way to support us and uphold a reasonable executive order. G: Did the demonstrations in Chicago that Martin Luther King was organizing
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • . It was on to avoid misconstruction of the visit-- purely social. F: You ,,,ere around, of course, and you didn't have much time to savor the reaction from the March 31 speech when Martin Luther King was shot down in Hemphis. h'hat uas your role i::l. th,," midst
  • with Martin Luther King, Jr. FBI role vs. Secret Service role; FBI jurisdiction in cases; FBI involvement in civil rights cases, especially the murder of three civil rights workers in Mississippi and Viola Liuzzo murder.
  • on various organizations, including the ongoing investigation which had been authorized by Attorney General Bobby Kennedy on Dr. Martin Luther King. As a result, there was considerable information picked up and then turned in to our team. I forwarded all
  • His political background; campaigning with LBJ in IL in 1964; Martin Luther King’s assassination and subsequent activities in Chicago; Shapiro’s involvement with the 1968 Chicago convention; the National Guard at the 1968 Chicago convention
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • resigned yet, at that time, as I recall. F: Yes. S: As a matter of fact, he was in Florida making a speech there, a dedication speech, when this broke here in Chicago the day that Martin Luther King was killed. I, of course, conferred with Otto Kerner
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • . King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were doing? Y: I don't recall a great deal of discussion on specifics. I do know that we discussed the possibility of certain methods resulting in a counter kind of reaction, and I can remember
  • McChesney Martin; advised LBJ on last State of the Union Message; continuing relationship between Truman and LBJ; LBJ after leaving office; wear-out factor in being head of a Cabinet; cabinet level relationships with White House staff.
  • to get involved in the problems of late spring-early summer of 1968. Particularly, I'm thinking about the assassination of Martin Luther King and the riot that broke out in Washington afterwards. I would like for you to detail what was the problem as seen
  • was called--I would have to check my records to get the exact date of it--prior to the election of '64. The meeting was called by Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, and present at that meeting were Mr. Wilkins, Whitney Young, Martin Luther King, A. Philip Randolph
  • on the second night--I concluded that Mr. Wilkins should be the speaker. Martin Luther King became temperamentally unhappy LBJ Presidential Library http://www.lbjlibrary.org ORAL HISTORY TRANSCRIPT Lyndon B. Johnson Library Oral Histories [NAID 24617781
  • --[Martin Luther] King, Whitney Young, [Roy] Wilkins--to try and get them to issue statements condemning the violence, to tell them also they should all remember his Howard University speech and that we'd move, LBJ Presidential Library http
  • involvement with the conference; conflict over inviting Martin Luther King to the conference; Patrick Moynihan; obtaining personnel and funding for the conference; problems with the Departments and Agencies; Moynihans' report on the black family, political
  • to do unsuccessfully, or go along with? B: Have you talked to Louis Martin? G: I'm going to see him-- B: You've got to see Louis. G: --Tuesday. B: Okay. Do you know Louis? G: Yes. B: Louis and I worked very closely together. Louis
  • by simply saying, "Don't do that," either by the White House saying or by us saying it. But they did transmit their concern and asked ways in which they could help and took advantage of our own attitudes because all of us--Martin Luther King, the National
  • Reedy’s return to LBJ’s staff; preparations for 1968 campaign; March 31, 1968 speech, Washington riots; assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Bobby Kennedy; Reedy’s book on the presidency; maritime strike; Sam Houston; last year of LBJ’s
  • to the end of the year, I think. R: That was one that I remember. It was a rather interesting situation. You know the facts on it, don't you? G: Essentially, yes, but before we get to that, any insights on the [Martin Luther] King assassination
  • histories: http://discoverlbj.org/exhibits/show/loh/oh Baker -- IV -- 21 G: Did it ever get into the question of Martin Luther King's leadership in particularly that Greenville project? B: Greenville project? G: Hell, I gather there was a movement
  • that. F: Shifting again, let's talk a little bit about the circumstances surrounding two major funerals in the Johnson Administration. One is the death of Martin Luther King and the other one, of course, is the death of Bobby Kennedy, both of which I'm
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • the President's speech because of the mechanics of getting the call through. Somebody had to tell him what it was all about. G: Now shortly after that, Martin Luther King was assassinated, a period of three or four days. R: Yes. G: Well, I guess even before
  • discharge motion; the public accommodations provision of the bill; the effect of violent civil-rights related events on the likelihood of enacting legislation; JFK's regard for Martin Luther King, Jr. (MLK) and the FBI's effort to destroy MLK's reputation; J
  • Proclamation. Not only was his birth announced by Vice President Johnson, eventually his godfather would be Martin Luther King, because earlier that year I was covering the demonstrations in Birmingham, and one day Dr. King asked me how my wife was. And I said
  • White House reaction to Watts riots; LBJ’s speech to the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission regarding rioters; Clark group’s report on Watts; LBJ-HHH relationship; Roger Wilkins; death of MLK; LBJ’s feelings about MLK; Louis Martin; Detroit
  • morning. I remember the most touching conversation was with Martin Luther King Sr. And Jim Gaither, who worked for Califano, said, "Mr. King, the President wants to know what can we do for you." And this old man said, "Oh, Mr. Gaither, that's
  • ; LBJ’s efforts in Vietnam; Martin Luther King’s assassination; working on the Commission for Federal-State Relations; LBJ inheriting JFK’s staff; being offered a federal appointment; LBJ deciding not to run in 1968; LBJ’s relationship with Robert Kennedy
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • friendly relationship with Dr. King's father. I knew Dr. King personally, but I didn't have any great intimate relationship there. I was in the President's office the night that Dr. Martin Luther King was assassinated. I was sitting there with him
  • . That's exactly what that occurred about. The guy that they were supposed to appoint was a gentleman here in Corpus Christi by the name of Luther Jones, supposed to appoint him a district judge. A: Is that our current mayor, Archie? LBJ Presidential
  • talked to them about this job, things were in a pretty static and steady state, and they looked like they would go on that way for a long time. King were alive. Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther Student unrest had not really started. It was a very
  • involving Vietnam; the riots in Washington, D.C., following Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death; Robert F. Kennedy's death and his personality; Abe Fortas' nomination as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court; the 1968 presidential election; George Wallace's
  • to a vote, but generally speaking I think he would have stayed with the administration. He would have defended it. G: Four or five days after this announcement, the March 31 speech that LBJ would not run, you have the assassination of Martin Luther King